A day at the estuary – waders and kingfisher

JXUIE0962The sun graced the fine autumn day as I looked out upon the estuary. The tide was already rising fast and the water rippled steadily over the mudflats covering the wader bird buffet.

The golden plovers stood together on the muddied bank; plumage shimmering with their jewelled colouring in the autumn sunlight. The redshanks took no solace in the stillness of the plovers and continued to feed along the edge of the rising water – their red legs dashing about. The desire to avoid the increasing tide did not spread to this species as one continued to wade through the water to reach another mud island, appearing to almost swim at one point. The ringed plovers did not share their eagerness for the water but continued to busy themselves on the banks. The jet black summer front plumage of the grey plover is no more, replaced with their grey and white speckled winter appearance – still a beautiful sight. Continue reading

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Welcoming Autumn

img_2515The leaves have changed now, losing their vigour as they alter in colour and contemplate detaching themselves from the tree – many having already fallen. This process is a vital survival strategy for these deciduous beings.

I gazed upon the rowan tree from my desk. The brilliant green foliage of summer had steadily vanished; a crop of beautiful red berries festooned the tree and I still dream of waxwings passing through the town and stripping the structure of these jewels before continuing on their way – what a sight that would be. The uppermost tree leaves turned a red russet colour more quickly than the rest, while a few still attempt to hold onto the summer feeling with their lime-tinged greenery. When the sun shines what is left of the green foliage fools you into believing it is a summer’s day, but recently the tides have turned and the darkening leaves fitted into the scene against the red sun, before Ophelia took many of them unwittingly into the sky, mixing them with the Sahara as they went. Continue reading

A Summer Wildlife Walk at Fingringhoe Wick Nature Reserve

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The August sunshine had finally arrived, despite the nearness of September, and the wildlife was appreciating this flurry of fine weather before the season was out. The swallows circled flying above my head, chattering as these feathered acrobats majestically changed direction within a second, the long tail streamers of the males following their lead. Swallows are for me a sign of summer, of endless days and evenings filled with a calmness in the air. Soon these icons of the season will depart for their wintering grounds in Africa, or at the bottom of a pond if old tales are to be believed, and their presence shall be missed. But for now we should appreciate their company as they all line up on the telephone wires as if reporting for a role call – a perfect chance for observing their red-rouged brown face and sleek blue-black plumage through the binoculars. Continue reading

A lawn of bees

I knelt carefully on the green oasis that was the unmown garden lawn, feeling the memories of a childhood spent adding grass stains to clothes while adventuring outside. The small circular leaves of clover covered by hands as I leant on the cushioned foliage, feeling the cool damp earth beneath my fingers. Yet it wasn’t reminiscence that brought me here, but the desire to listen to the humming and buzzing of the orchestra of bees. Continue reading

A spring walk among bluebells

Alice Johnson aLocated in the picturesque village of Stock, Swan Wood becomes awash with the lush violet display of bluebells from around April to June. Walking along the pathways into the woodland you can see the flecks of mauve colour appearing from around the tree trunks, as if someone was just adding colour to their painting. Walk a few more steps along the bare earth pathways and you will soon see the full canvas of delicate lavender blue dominating the woodland floor. The hornbeam coppice and birch trees are surrounded by this terrestrial flowering ocean; one of the greatest floral displays in the British calendar. Continue reading

The Approach of Spring

robinDespite the grey weather, the light is holding steadier into the evening while the birds seem to have gained a spritely energy, and many have begun to fill the air with their song. The robins who kept us entertained with their solos during the darker months when all other birds went quiet, now sing from the branches in the garden; a faint outline of their red breast visible on a small silhouette as they sing in the unclear light of the end of day. Several robins are visiting the garden at present. One flits onto its twiggy throne and surveys the area this little creature thinks of as its own; another arrives and they soon become twisted in a game of tag, in a less friendly way than when it is played by children, and their small bodies dart across the garden then vanish over the fence as the chase continues into another’s abode. Continue reading

A Woodland Wander

The mud and leaf matter had been well compacted on the ground by the feet of New Year walkers eager to burn off those Christmas calories. The wide paths cut deep through the woodland, which allowed access to the hordes of visiting families but reduced the wilderness feeling the woodland bestowed upon me. I wondered how these man-made rides affected the woodland’s functioning, as everywhere I turned there were different routes to choose. Families pushed their prams along the pathways while children ran around in the mud, with a look of great happiness on their faces. It was good for the families, but I wanted to escape, so I walked briskly past the chattering parents and giggling children and onwards into the woodland. The paths were still wide but I passed a tree with its roots that were exposed to the world – they twisted and turned as a stormy sea would. Continue reading

Why Attenborough Documentaries will always be needed

For nature lovers Attenborough documentaries are the pinnacle of conservation inspiration. They are however much more than that as they create a time when discussing wildlife and nature becomes the ‘hot’ topic and those who are in the minority for their love of the environment are now at the forefront of the discussion. Shouting about how amazing nature is suddenly becomes ‘cool’. Continue reading